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Academic Lecture: Emission Modeling and Control on Dynamic Traffic Networks
2015-11-6
Time: 900-1000, Nov. 6th, 2015

Venue:
Room 115, College of Transport & Communications


Speaker:
Dr. Xuegang (Jeff) Ban is an Associate Professor of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). He received his B.S. and M.S. in Automobile Engineering from Tsinghua University, and his M.S. in Computer Sciences and Ph.D. in Transportation Engineering from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. His research interests are in Transportation Network System Modeling and Simulation, Urban Traffic Modeling and Control, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), and Transportation Big Data Analytics. He has published nearly 50 papers in refereed journals or as book chapters, and more than 40 papers in refereed conference proceedings. Dr. Ban is an Associate Editor of Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems, Networks and Spatial Economics, and Transportmetrica B, and serves on the editorial board of Transportation Research, Part B & Part C. He is a member of the Network Modeling Committee (ADB30) and a member of the Vehicle-Highway Automation Committee (AHB30) of the Transportation Research Board (TRB), under the National Academies. He also served as the Elected Vice Chair (2010-2011) and Chair (2012-2013) of the ITS SIG (cluster) under the Transportation Science and Logistics (TSL) Society of INFORMS. Dr. Ban received the 2011 CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the New Faculty Award from the Council of University Transportation Centers (CUTC) and the American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) in 2012, and the School of Engineering Research Excellence Award (for Junior Faculty) from RPI in 2014.

Abstract:

We present a first-best pricing framework to estimate and control total emissions (and total travel times) of a dynamic traffic network. The framework is decomposed into two sub-problems. The first problem solves a dynamic system optimum (DSO) problem and the second problem computes the optimal tolls of network links using the computed DSO solution as the input. The results show that (i) certain monotonicity property of the emission function is crucial for the modeling and analysis of dynamic network emission control; and (ii) free-flow solutions (i.e., no congestion or queue in the network) can play an important role in designing network-wide emission pricing strategies.

 

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